Mobile Privacy

Outsourcing Garbled Circuits, Fall 2012-Fall 2015
Georgia Tech Information Security Center (GTISC). Patrick Traynor, advisor

Garbled circuits are becoming a viable method for privacy-preserving computation, but are likely to remain too computationally expensive for use on mobile devices. Our work seeks to apply garbled circuits to privacy-preserving mobile applications by outsourcing the costly cryptographic operations to the cloud. Provided with network connectivity, our protocols allow a mobile device to compute secure functions efficiently without revealing private information to the cloud or any other parties involved in the computation.

Efficient Mobile Oblivious Computation (EMOC), Fall 2010-Summer 2012
Georgia Tech Information Security Center (GTISC). Patrick Traynor, advisor

Developing tools that allow for provably secure two-party computations between mobile devices. Rather than using Secure Function Evaluation to protect the user's private inputs, our goal is to leverage homomorphic encryption to provide a more efficient protocol that provides equivalent security guarantees. For more information, visit www.foryourphoneonly.org.

Decoding Vibrations From Nearby Keyboards Using Mobile Phone Accelerometers, Spring 2011
Georgia Tech Information Security Center (GTISC). Patrick Traynor, advisor

Using an iPhone accelerometer and neural networks to correlate keyboard vibrations with typed text. The goal of this work is to demonstrate a need for increased access control of smartphone accelerometer data.

Networking

Collaborative Spectrum Sensing, Summer 2011
Sandia National Labs, Albuquerque, NM

Performed research in collaborative spectrum sensing for cognitive radios. Developed a distributed sensing system with authentication security and robustness to erroneous or imperfect sensing data.

Network Routing Algorithms, Summer 2010
Laboratory for Telecommunications Sciences (LTS), College Park, MD

Programmed and tested graph algorithms in Matlab for routing network traffic. Statistically demonstrated algorithm improvement over previous existing versions. Performed as a part of the Computer Science Internship Program.

Delay-Tolerant Networking, Summer 2010
Laboratory for Telecommunications Sciences (LTS), College Park, MD

Developed software [Perl] for encoding and transmitting information across delay-tolerant networks using the open-source dtn protocol implementation DTN2. Performed as a part of the Computer Science Internship Program.

Other

Collegiate Certificate Authority, Spring 2008-Spring 2010
Belmont University. Glenn Acree, advisor

Designed a CA system structure and governing policy to be scalable to fit any small college network. The final thesis is currently being considered as foundational material for an information security course at Belmont.

WormAnalyzer: Digital Image Processing, Spring 2007-Fall 2007
Belmont University. Glenn Acree, advisor

Developed biology analysis software implemented in Java. The program detected the outline of worms in a video frame and captured relevant measurements.